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Empowering Youthful Aging
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    These moist and flavorful muffins make a perfect on-the-go breakfast or afternoon snack. Unlike tempting, empty calorie baked goods, this month’s healthy muffin recipe is tasty and guilt-free. Yogurt replaces some of the oil in the recipe and keeps the muffins moist. Consider freezing an extra batch to have on hand for those cold winter mornings or unexpected visitors.

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    Did you know that some foods contribute to bone degeneration? Yes, these nutritional tricksters interfere with the body’s ability to absorb calcium, which is essential for the development and strengthening of bones. Even worse, the foods that affect bone health can lead to bone disease later in life.

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    Yield: 3 cups total; 4 (3/4-cup) servings Thanks to our friends at Tufts University, here’s a side dish recipe to liven up your dinner tonight. This colorful whole-grain pilaf is an excellent accompaniment to fish and chicken. If you have any pilaf leftover, toss in cherry tomatoes, scallions and whatever salad fixings you have on hand, moisten with lemon juice and olive oil, and you have a delicious quinoa salad. Ingredients 2 tsp olive or vegetable oil 1 chopped small onion 2/3 cup shredded carrot; 2/3 cup rinsed and drained quinoa 1 1/3 cups reduced-sodium chicken (or vegetable) broth 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley (or dill) 2 tsp grated fresh lemon zest 1/4 tsp salt and pepper to taste Directions 1. Heat 2 tsp olive or vegetable oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. 2. Add 1 chopped small onion and 2/3 cup shredded carrot; cook, stirring often, until softened, 2 to 3 minutes. 3. Add 2/3 cup rinsed and drained quinoa; cook, stirring, until aromatic, 1 to 2 minutes. 4. Add 1 1/3 cups reduced-sodium chicken (or vegetable) broth; bring to a simmer. 5. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer until quinoa is tender and most of …

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    As a nation, we throw down millions of dollars each year searching for the remedy for aging skin, hair and nails. It turns out that you can head off many common beauty concerns by simply noshing on the right foods. That’s right, eating well is not only good for general health, but certain foods are especially skillful in smoothing wrinkles, giving hair a glossy shine, and even strengthening flimsy nails. Save your high brow beauty store dollars and consider adding these tasty, get-gorgeous items to your next grocery shopping list. Watermelon That’s right … this summertime fave is rich with lycopene. Why is this antioxidant compound so important? Simple: it helps skin stave off UV damage. In fact, researchers believe this melon contains as much as 40 percent more of the phytochemical than raw tomatoes. What’s more, that’s the equivalent of an SPF 3! Obviously you can’t toss your daily sunscreen, but this delicious, juicy melon can bolster your body’s natural sun protection. Eggs Sure, there’s lots of super duper nail products out there that promise strong nails, but experts know that healthy nails start from the inside out. Our nails are made of protein, so when we aren’t getting …

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    Did you know that, according to AARP, more than 48 million Americans have some type of hearing loss that seriously disrupts their life? What’s more, that includes 1 in 6 baby boomers and two-thirds of those over 70. And as our boomers age that number is expected to rise significantly in the future. Hearing aids address this frustrating issue; however they are an unwanted expense and stigma for some people. Fortunately, there are proven strategies to protect and improve your hearing that don’t involve hearing aids. In a nutshell, a healthy body and mind are much less susceptible to hearing loss. Here are five lifestyle tweaks that can preserve your ears for years. Get Your Heart Pumping! Cardio exercise — walking, running, cycling — helps to improve blood flow to your ears, which is good for your hearing. Wear a helmet for biking because a fall that results in concussion can harm your hearing.  Make Friends With Ear Protection: Protect your hearing and avoid loud situations whenever possible. Earplugs do more than dull the sound of a snoring spouse. They can protect your ears from the loud noise of machinery like lawn mowers and power tools. Comfortable plugs and noise-canceling headphones …

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  • 11/07/17--01:36: Black Bean Chili
  • During the frenzy of the holidays, we tend to put healthy meals on hold, but here’s a delicious recipe we’ve adapted from Prevention magazine that can help out. We love that it is made in a slow cooker, so dinner is ready when you rush through the door, exhausted after a marathon shopping day!

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  • 11/13/17--10:36: 5 Great Longevity Tips
  • What are the secrets to a long life and healthy aging? And how can you kick those common aging laments to the curb? Juvenon provides an essential foundation for cellular health and in turn renewed energy and vitality.

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    We adapted a Cooking Light cranberry recipe that features half the sugar of classic cranberry sauce. Thanks to a trio of warm spices, this recipe takes cranberry sauce out of candy-sweet territory and into the world of robust holiday condiments. While it’s perfect on roast turkey, don’t discount this sauce’s zesty punch for pork or chicken. Apples counter the tartness of the cranberries and help the sauce thicken. The rustic chunky look of the two fruits is what makes the sauce beautiful and enticing. Spiced Apple-Cranberry Sauce Active Time: 8 minutes Total Time: 26 minutes Servings: 8 (serving size: about ¼ cup) Ingredients 1 (12-oz.) pkg. fresh cranberries, divided ½ cup light brown sugar 2 ½ Tbsp apple cider ½ tsp ground cinnamon ¼ tsp ground cloves ¼ tsp nutmeg 1 cup chopped apple 1 ½ Tbsp apple cider vinegar ½ tsp kosher salt ½ tsp black pepper Directions Reserve ½ cup cranberries. Place the remaining cranberries and brown sugar in a saucepan over medium-low. Add apple cider, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg to cranberries and sugar in pan. Cook 8 to 10 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high. Stir in apple and vinegar. Cook 8 minutes. Stir in reserved cranberries, salt, …

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  • 11/27/17--11:00: Four Reasons To Love Tea
  • Lately, everyone from Dr. Oz to Oprah has been touting the benefits of tea. The Tea Association of the United States cites health benefits as the main reason tea consumption has grown steadily for the past two decades. Technically tea is anything that comes from the tea plant, including green tea, black tea, white tea and oolong tea. So, if the tea leaf is present, you’ll get all the health benefits. When you learn of its many healthy charms, a cup of tea just might replace your favorite Starbuck’s standard.

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    Yawn … it’s 2 p.m. and all you want to do is take a snooze! If this sounds familiar, you are not alone. In our busy world, many of us observe our energy level dipping on a regular basis. However, if your exhaustion is lifestyle-related, there are many ways you can up your energy levels … without downing another cup of joe! Stress Less: Constant high levels of stress will leave you feeling tired and drained. It’s important to Incorporate stress busters in your daily life. Strategies include meditation, talking with a friend, taking Sparky for a long walk or even watching a funny movie (laughter is the best medicine!). Get Moving: We all know that regular exercise is important for your health. However, it may seem counterintuitive to exercise when you’re feeling tired and all you want is a nap. Luckily, you don’t have to run a marathon to experience energy boosting benefits. In fact, one study found that sedentary people with persistent, unexplained fatigue decreased their tiredness by 65% just by regularly participating in low-intensity cycling. Other studies prove that even a 10-minute walk is a better pick me up than a snack! Quit Smoking: Of course, you …

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    For many people food is inextricably linked to emotion, and in particular stress and depression. It’s common for people to reach for comfort foods such as macaroni and cheese, cookies and ice cream when the chips are down.

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    This Middle Eastern dip is a colorful alternative to hummus and a nice appetizer for holiday parties. It can also be used as a sandwich spread or as a sauce for grilled meats and fish. Bell peppers are an excellent source of carotenoids and vitamin C and are members of the nightshade family.

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  • 12/20/17--09:00: 4 Delicious Stress Busters
  • The holidays are upon us and with them comes joy and laughter. But let’s be honest … there’s always an element of stress involved with these festivities. Here’s a tip: incorporate these super stress-zapping foods into your diet and breeze through this busy season!

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  • 01/08/18--10:17: Six Ways to Regain Focus
  • Chances are if you are reading this, you’d like to keep your mind and memories as sharp as can be, for as long as possible. In a December 2017 newsletter, AARP offered six science-backed tips to up your concentration and focus skills. Grab a good novel: In a study at Emory University in Atlanta, subjects read at night and underwent scans of their brain daily. The scans showed increased connectivity in the part of the brain associated with language. Most interesting to researchers: The neural changes persisted for five days after participants finished the book. Play an instrument: Or mediate. Or write without interruption for 30 days. “Focusing on a single, complex task improves your ability to focus on other tasks,” says one scientist. It turns out that making a habit of these activities can result in “attentional state training,” where you are better able to get in a relaxed, focused state for other activities. Work in the morning: In one study, participants ages 60 to 82 performed better on cognitive tasks and were more focused when tested in the morning than in the afternoon. Learn a language: Researchers found that bilingual speakers were better at maintaining focus and attention …

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    It shouldn’t come as a big surprise that a plant-based diet has plenty of benefits. A recent study in the JAMA Internal Medicine concludes that eating more legumes, vegetables, fruits and less meat is associated with lower mortality risk. Alice Lichtenstein, director of the Tuft University’s Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory discussed the chink in the vegetarian armor in a recent newsletter. “It’s important to note that vegetarians in the study were more highly educated, less likely to smoke, exercised more and were thinner,” she says. She notes that as with anything, you need to think of it in terms of the whole package. For instance, all meat substitutes are not created equal. Cheese is high in saturated fat, so quiche on Meatless Monday is not going to get you the hoped-for results. However, a rice and bean casserole might. In the Tufts Newsletter, Lichtenstein says it’s OK if you’re not ready to swear off meat completely. It’s better to think about the whole diet. She says that if animal products are part of your normal diet they should be mostly fish and poultry. And it’s always a wise idea to boost your servings of veggies and fruit, opt for whole grains …

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    Top Three Brain Foods in One Meal! The right diet can prevent heart disease, high blood pressure or cancer. But now health experts are finding that certain foods are beneficial to brain function. There may be no cure for Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, but there are foods that play a positive role in overall brain health.

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    Does it feel like you are constantly hungry? You aren’t alone, according to a Washington Post article by nutritionist Carrie Dennett. She says that assuming you’re eating regularly throughout the day, there are several possible explanations why you can’t shake the gnawing feeling. You just may be surprised by the following reasons … 1. Your diet is low in protein Protein contributes the most to satiety, which is that feeling that you’ve had enough to eat. No need to go overboard on protein, but include some protein and each meal and snack and chances are you’ll feel satisfied longer. Not a meat-lover? Try eggs, tofu or yogurt to up your protein intake. 2. Your gut’s not diverse enough There’s something to that expression “follow your gut.” In fact, some scientists refer to the gut and the microbes that dwell in it as the “mini brain.” That’s because it influences – among other thing – mood, appetite, and food cravings. Dennett says that 20 minutes after a meal, certain bacteria in your gut send signals that you’ve had enough to eat by stimulating the release of a hormone that has been linked to feelings of satiety (fullness). But when you lack …

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    Perhaps you’ve heard that exercising and sleep slows brain aging. But now researchers have dug deeper and found other lifestyle tweaks that can have an equally beneficial impact on your brain. 1. Energize brain with squash: That’s right, the Journals of Gerontology reports that eating squash daily could cut your dementia risk by 20%, plus help your brain function as if it were three years younger. It turns out that beta-carotene – the orange pigment – in butternut and acorn squash nourishes and energizes brain cells, plus block the formation of damaging plague inside brain arteries. 2. Clear brain fog with broccoli: A study in the journal Genesis suggests that eating three cups of cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, etc.) weekly could shake off brain fog, often within six weeks. 3. Sweep trouble away with onions: Spanish researchers say that consuming as little as ¼ cup of any type of onion each day slows brain aging 21% or more – and makes your brain function as if it’s six years younger. 4. Your brain’s fav drink: Sipping two cups of green tea daily revs the flow of oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood to your brain 25%, staving off brain aging. According to …

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    Did you know that a whopping 75% of brain aging can be avoided by making small tweaks to your everyday routine? Three experts recently discussed these brain health hacks in Women’s World magazine. Here are four brain boosting tips that you can adopt today. It’s easier than you might think to cultivate good brain performance! 1. Grow new neurons by taking a stroll “Walking without breaks helps keep the part of your brain that grows brain cells more resilient,” reveals psychotherapist, Mike Dow, Ph.D. In fact, it’s so effective that strolling for 25 a few times a week will keep your brain’s “incubator for new brain cells in shape. 2. Take five for five Dr. Leanne Young says chronic multitasking causes the brain to shrink. “In particular, it reduces the size of the hippocampus, a brain region supporting memory and learning,” Young says. The fix? Cut back on multitasking and let your brain recharge five times a day by taking five minutes to rest – no social media, no TV, no emails … just rest. “Spend those five minutes stretching, going outside or meditating,” Young suggests. 3. Kids’ Play Mike Dow says game concentration is shown to sharpen memory. Try …